Garnet, or Pyrope Enlarge
June 1 1810. published by Jas Sowerby London.
British Mineralogy
CCCLXIV
Silex granatum

Garnet, or Pyrope

  • Class 2. Earths.
  • Order 1. Homogeneous.
  • Gen. 4. Silex.
  • Spec. 26. Garnet.
  • Syn.
    • Pyrope. Le grenat granuliforme de Bohème. Haüy, 2. 555.
    • Edler granat. Emmerl. 3. 246.

Mineralogists have made a division in Garnets, (if I may so express myself,) by considering Pyrope as a distinct species, when its only distinguishing character is its being found in irregular pebbles and not crystallized. Lapidaries long since used to consider Scotch Garnets of a peculiarly brilliant lustre as different, under the particular appellation of Scotch Garnets. I have some of these cut when in fashion about thirty years since, and my friends have sent me some in the rock under the name of Pyrope. It is perhaps one of the most striking examples of nice discrimination that may ever happen:—these may be distinguished by the Scotch Pyrope having the lustre inclining to fine red, and the other to orange*; and it should seem that they can scarcely be distinguished when asunder.

Dr. Babington was so good as to favour me with the Pyope from Hungary, It is remarkable that it should never be found crystallized, which is one of the specific characters.

Our substance is as remarkable for being rather particular in the crystal, being the proper Garnet Dodccaedron with bevillings on each side of the edges, which is not usual in common Garnets. See the right hand figure. This is no less remarkable for some being truncated at those solid angles, or alternate corners, where three edges meet, I believe not before observed. If analysis should show any material difference, this will properly constitute a new species. The crystals are in a gangue of Quartz more or less stained with Oxide of Iron, part of it having a dingy greasy aspect. The specimen was sent me from Ely, Fifeshire. It is said that the Pyrope is found in the sand on the sea-shore near the same place, and probably derived from the neighbouring rock.—Might not loosened specimens of this be found on the shore worn so as to obliterate the appearance of having been crystallized? and may it not also happen so in general with those of Bohemia?

  • * See red and orange in my Elucidation of Colours.
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